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Epidemiology of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in North America

[ Vol. 26 , Issue. 10 ]

Author(s):

Tamoore Arshad, Pegah Golabi, Linda Henry and Zobair M. Younossi*   Pages 993 - 997 ( 5 )

Abstract:


Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly becoming the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. This is primarily driven by the global epidemic of obesity and diabetes as well as the aging of the general population. Most of the epidemiology data of NAFLD for North America are published from studies originating in the United States (U.S.). The overall prevalence of NAFLD in the U.S. is estimated to be 24%. Hispanic Americans have a higher prevalence of NAFLD, whereas African Americans have a lower prevalence of NAFLD. The exact contributions of genetic and environmental factors on these differences in the prevalence rates have not been determined. From the spectrum of NAFLD, patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are at the highest risk of progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The most recent data regarding the progression of NASH suggest a complex pattern of progression and regression of fibrosis. Factors influencing the progression and regression of NASH have not been fully described. More research is needed to better understand NAFLD in Mexico and Canada.

Keywords:

NAFLD, NASH, cirrhosis, PNPLA3, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease.

Affiliation:

Center for Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Medical Campus, Falls Church, VA, Betty and Guy Beatty Center for Integrated Research, Inova Health System, Falls Church, VA, Center for Outcomes Research in Liver Diseases, Washington, DC, Center for Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Medical Campus, Falls Church, VA



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